Publication

Identification of transcriptome SNPs between Xiphophorus lines and species for assessing allele specific gene expression within F(1) interspecies hybrids.

Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2011 Apr 3. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Variations in gene expression are essential for the evolution of novel phenotypes and for speciation. Studying allelic specific gene expression (ASGE) within interspecies hybrids provides a unique opportunity to reveal underlying mechanisms of genetic variation. Using Xiphophorus interspecies hybrid fishes and high-throughput next generation sequencing technology, we were able to assess variations between two closely related vertebrate species, Xiphophorus maculatus and Xiphophorus couchianus, and their F(1) interspecies hybrids. We constructed transcriptome-wide SNP polymorphism sets between two highly inbred X. maculatus lines (JP 163 A and B), and between X. maculatus and a second species, X. couchianus. The X. maculatus JP 163 A and B parental lines have been separated in the laboratory for ?70years and we were able to identify SNPs at a resolution of 1 SNP per 49kb of transcriptome. In contrast, SNP polymorphisms between X. couchianus and X. maculatus species, which diverged ?5-10 million years ago, were identified about every 700bp. Using 6524 transcripts with identified SNPs between the two parental species (X. maculatus and X. couchianus), we mapped RNA-seq reads to determine ASGE within F(1) interspecies hybrids. We developed an in silico X. couchianus transcriptome by replacing 90,788 SNP bases for X. maculatus transcriptome with the consensus X. couchianus SNP bases and provide evidence that this procedure overcomes read mapping biases. Employment of the in silico reference transcriptome and tolerating 5 mismatches during read mapping allow direct assessment of ASGE in the F(1) interspecies hybrids. Overall, these results show that Xiphophorus is a tractable vertebrate experimental model to investigate how genetic variations that occur during speciation may affect gene interactions and the regulation of gene expression.

Authors

Shen Y, Catchen J, Garcia T, Amores A, Beldroth I, Wagner JR, Zhang Z, Postlethwait J, Warren W, Schartl M, Walter RB.

Institute Authors

Wes Warren, Ph.D.